History

For more than sixty years this area has been Valley Village.  According to the Los Angeles Times, a new community was born and articles of incorporation were granted in May 1939.  At a meeting on the grounds of the King Charney Rancho on Magnolia Boulevard plans were laid for launching a beautification project.  The plan called for a model community featuring parkways, cycling paths, a series of small parks, recreation centers and other amenities.

In 1986 residents formed a homeowners group to address the threat of uncontrolled high rise buildings.  Inasmuch as the Post Office branch always had carried the name Valley Village, it was felt that it was time to resurrect the name.  The request was taken to the Los Angeles City Council and with the help of former Council members Joel Wachs, John Ferraro and Zev Yaroslavsky (now a county supervisor) it was approved.

To complete the process, a “Specific Plan” was needed to restrict height and guarantee low density in new construction, whether commercial or private homes.

The Specific Plan prohibits certain types of commercial enterprises, it regulates the placement of balconies and rooftop installations on apartment buildings, and requires appropriate landscapingaround them.  No new commercial buildings may be higher than 36 feet and no homes higher than 30 feet.  There are other restrictions as well.


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